The American Law Institute,
Restatement Third, The Law Governing Lawyers (2000)

§ 67.  Using or Disclosing Information to Prevent,
Rectify, or Mitigate Substantial Financial Loss

        (1)  A lawyer may use or disclose confidential client information when the lawyer reasonably believes that its use or disclosure is necessary to prevent a crime or fraud, and:

        (a)  the crime or fraud threatens substantial financial loss;

        (b)  the loss has not yet occurred;

        (c)  the lawyer's client intends to commit the crime or fraud either personally or through a third person; and

        (d)  the client has employed or is employing the lawyer's services in the matter in which the crime or fraud is committed.

        (2)  If a crime or fraud described in Subsection (1) has already occurred, a lawyer may use or disclose confidential client information when the lawyer reasonably believes its use or disclosure is necessary to prevent, rectify, or mitigate the loss.

        (3)  Before using or disclosing information under this Section, the lawyer must, if feasible, make a good-faith effort to persuade the client not to act.  If the client or another person has already acted the lawyer must, if feasible, advise the client to warn the victim or to take other action to prevent, rectify, or mitigate the loss. The lawyer must, if feasible, also advise the client of the lawyer's ability to use or disclose information as provided in this Section and the consequences thereof.

        (4)  A lawyer who takes action or decides not to take action permitted under this Section is not, solely by reason of such action or inaction, subject to professional discipline, liable for damages to the lawyer's client or any third person, or barred from recovery against a client or third person.

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